Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Cine Europa Going Strong On It's 19th Year This Sept 2016!

MANILA, Philippines — In celebration 25 years of the European Union Delegation to the Philippines and the friendship between the EU and the Philippines, Cine Europa is highlighted this year by a strong lineup of Filipino filmmakers who have earned a niche in Europe and in other countries.

Filipino-Italian filmmaker Ruben Maria Soriquez will discuss the Filipino-Italian co-production "Of Sinners and Saints" which will banner the annual film festival's premiere on September 17 at Shangri-La Plaza in Mandaluyong City.

Saturday, August 27, 2016

NAST PHL HOLDS S&T FORUM ON “APPROPRIATE RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, DEMONSTRATION, & DEPLOYMENT (RDDD) APPROACH ON FARMING SYSTEMS”


The National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines (NAST PHL) conducted the Science and Technology Policy Forum titled “From Monocrops to Systems: What is an appropriate Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RDDD) Approach?” on April 7, 2016 at the Institute of Plant Breeding, University of the Philippines Los Baños.
The policy forum was conducted in partnership with the Philippine Council for Agriculture, Aquatic, and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCAARRD), Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Research and Extension, and the Institute of Plant Breeding, University of the Philippines Los Baños (IPB-UPLB).
The participants were welcomed by Acd. Ruben L. Villareal, member and immediate past chair of the Agricultural Sciences Division (ASD) of NAST PHL. Dr. Rex B. Demafelis, vice chancellor for Research and Extension of UPLB, delivered the message of UPLB Chancellor Fernando C. Sanchez, who recognizes the efforts of NAST PHL in addressing pressing issues our country is faced with, from poverty to global competitiveness. Dr. Demafelis also pitched for the conduct of a policy forum regarding the use of biofuel to reduce greenhouse emissions.
Academician Eufemio T. Rasco, chair of the ASD, briefly reviewed the past policy forums which have led to the present one. He discussed the limitations of monoculture farming system and existing technologies in terms of diversification, intensification, and integration. He pointed out that on the definition of RDDD (Research, Development, Demonstration and Deployment), we are weak in terms of research and deployment while we stand strong on development and demonstration. Thus, he added that it is imperative that the continuum of RDDD process be strengthened.
Dr. Eduardo Jimmy P. Quilang, deputy director for development of the Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice), discussed and pushed for rural transformation through community-based farming systems. Among the challenges of agriculture that he mentioned are the increasing population of the Philippines, which is predicted to reach up to 190 million by 2050, aging farmers, drought, urbanization, poverty, and decreasing extension workers and interest in agricultural ventures. Dr. Quilang presented the projects and movement that PhilRice has been undertaking not only to produce high yielding, resilient, adaptable, and nutrient-rich rice crops but to also provide clean, green, practical, and smart technologies and services to rice farmers.
The appropriate RDDD approach for corn was tackled by Dr. Artemio M. Salazar, research professor of the Institute of Plant Breeding (IPB). According to Dr. Salazar, change is impossible without motivation and a process of education. He discussed the monocropping practice of corn
farmers and encouraged the intercropping of crops such as legumes, which are good sources of protein, with corn to increase the farmers’ income. Dr. Salazar also gave an overview of the research, extension, and commercialization effort of IPB, which include the demonstration of sustained corn farm productivity and sustained farmers’ income through crop rotation.
Coconut is another major crop of the Philippines. Mr. Ramon L. Rivera, deputy administrator for research, development, and extension of the Philippine Coconut Authority (PCA), discussed the coconut industry profile and challenges of the coconut industry. Moreover, he discussed various innovative production systems which feature intercropping of coconut with various crops and livestock, that PCA has developed and disseminated in the country.
Lastly, Academician Rafael D. Guerrero III discussed the benefits of aqua-based farming system, which is an integrated farming of fish and other aquatic species with land-based or sea-based culture species, and aquaponics, which is an integrated farming of fish and high-value crops such as lettuce and tomatoes with a water recirculation system. Through these methods, fish and crops can be organically grown and inorganic wastes can be reduced since there is no need to use fertilizers anymore. Despite the existence of these practices decades ago, farmers still practice monocropping.
The discussions were summarized by Dr. Marcos B. Valdez Jr, NAST Outstanding Young Scientist awardee and professor at the Far Eastern University, who reiterated that agri-biosystem of farming is needed to improve farmer income and to lessen environmental impacts of farming. He stressed that technologies for diversification and intensification are available but their extension to farmers is rather limited.
This is the first NAST-sponsored science and technology policy forum held in the University of the Philippines Los Baños. Many issues ranging from agro-modernization to crop diversification, research budget allocation to the need for technopreneurship as a means to improve the income of agriculturists were raised and were addressed by the guest speakers during the open forum.
National Scientist Dolores A. Ramirez, in her closing remarks, thanked everyone for attending the forum and left a message for the participants to reflect on: why is technology not adapted? She noted the substantial attendance and the active participation of the attendees at the policy forum.
The National Academy of Science and Technology PHL is the premier advisory and recognition body on science and technology in the country. Visit our website at www.nast.ph or email us at secretariat@nast.ph. Please also like and follow us at: www.facebook.com/nastphlwww.twitter.com/NASTPHL, and www.instagram.com/nastphl/.
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
June 23, 2016 ~ H2O Hotel, Luneta, Manila
Contact Person: ACD. WILLIAM G. PADOLINA
Member, Mathematical and Physical Sciences Division
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
837.3170 ~ secretariat@nast.ph
FORUM ON THE CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE K-12 SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS (STEM) CURRICULUM
On June 23, 2016, the National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines, through the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Division (MPSD), conducted the Forum on the Challenges and Opportunities in the Implementation of the K-12 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Curriculum. Various stakeholders of the program, from the academe and public and private institutions, participated in the forum.
Academician William G. Padolina, member of MPSD, welcomed the participants and pointed out that "having the K-12 system in place does not exactly mean that there is no more room for improvement.” He acknowledges that “there is still work that needs to be done in addressing the challenges in implementation and in improving the system and the curriculum itself as we are already in the last phase of the transition period.”
Mr. Joseph R. Jacob, supervising education program specialist of the Bureau of Curriculum Development - Curriculum Standards Development Division, Department of Education (DepEd), discussed the current status of the K-12 STEM program. The reform in the curriculum intends to produce scientifically, environmentally, and technologically literate graduates with 21st century skills. Mr. Jacob explained that in ensuring the efficiency of the program, DepEd has conducted consultative meetings with concerned stakeholders in developing the science program curriculum and curriculum guides.
The spiral progression approach in the Philippine K-12 curriculum was discussed by Dr. Marlene B. Ferido, science education specialist V of National Institute for Science and Mathematics Education Development, University of the Philippines. According to Dr. Ferido, the common misconception about the spiral progression approach is that it is associated with the integrated approach in science. The spiral progression approach is a means to teach from the simplest concepts to the more complex ones through the revisiting of basic foundations as new concepts are tackled. This transition to the use of spiral progression approach was recognized to be difficult not only to students but also to teachers. Intensification of pre-service training for teachers which focuses on the understanding of the spiral progression approach is needed to address this concern.
Private and public high school teachers were also invited as discussants and shared their experiences and insights on the implementation of the K-12 curriculum in their respective institutions. The discussants were: Mr. Bonn Lester Floyd R. Cervantes of Makati High School, Mr. John Gabriel T. Bilog of Ateneo de
Manila Senior High School, and Ms. Ana Jamille A. Restubog of San Francisco High School. Dr. Ramon R. Miranda, former executive director of the Philippine Science High School Systems, served as a reactor of the forum.
Being in the front line, the discussants raised their concern on how to properly implement the program, issues such as, addressing the teachers training needs, ability to adjust with the current set-up, and capacity building, were tackled. These were acknowledged to be significant in sustaining the program. The discussants shared that in their respective schools, sharing of teaching styles among themselves are their primary means of dealing with the teaching-related changes in the curricula. It was also shared that some students enroll in the STEM strand even if their skills do not match with the requirement of the strand. With this, the concern on formulating a mechanism for screening students enrolling in the different tracks was also raised.
Dr. Miranda reacted on the risk of assuming that specialized teacher could readily teach in other fields when training is still needed. Student learning in the K-12 STEM program must be the major concern above all. Dr. Miranda challenged the participants to assess and reflect on their teaching practices, policies, and resources as to how these make students learn effectively.
Academician Fortunato B. Sevilla III, member of MPSD, was the moderator and master of ceremonies.
The National Academy of Science and Technology PHL is the premier advisory and recognition body on science and technology in the country. Visit our website at www.nast.ph or email us at secretariat@nast.ph. Please also like and follow us at: www.facebook.com/nastphlwww.twitter.com/NASTPHL, and www.instagram.com/nastphl/.
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
Contact Person: Ms. LUNINGNING E. SAMARITA - DOMINGO
Director IV
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
837.3170 ~ secretariat@nast.ph
RESEARCH SHIP NAMED IN HONOR OF NATIONAL SCIENTIST GREGORIO VELASQUEZ
On April 28 2016, R/V Melville is renamed as BRP Gregorio Velasquez after National Scientist (NS) Gregorio T. Velasquez, who is recognized for his pioneer scientific studies of the biology, ecology, and uses of Philippine algae.
NS Velasquez was selected as one of the first academicians of the National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines (NAST PHL) in 1978 and was conferred the rank and title of National Scientist in 1983. He founded the Algological Society of the Philippines, which is now called the Phycological Society of the Philippinhnology, Philippines

June 30, 2016 | Astoria Plaza Manila
Contact Person: ACD. AURA C. MATIAS
Focal Person
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
837.3170 ~ secretariat@nast.ph
POLICY FORUM ON S&T HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT:
LOOKING BACK AND LOOKING FORWARD
In order to propose a 6-year science and technology (S&T) human resource development strategy, the National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines (NAST PHL) have gathered stakeholders from the Department of Science and Technology (DOST), the academe, concerned public and private institutions, participants from the professional societies, industry sector, and the media for a policy forum on June 30, 2016 at Astoria Plaza Manila.
The Policy Forum on S&T Human Resource Development: Looking Back and Looking Forward aims to look at the current state of S&T personnel in the Philippines, and the challenges and opportunities faced in a growing knowledge economy. It also aims to view the need for more research scientists and engineers for the country and propose resolutions to address current issues and concerns regarding S&T competencies, talent mobility, and job opportunities.
The participants were welcomed by Academician (Acd.) Fabian M. Dayrit, acting president of NAST PHL. He also presented the National Science Consortium, its members, initiatives, and activities. “It takes an ecosystem to train a scientist,” he stressed as he narrates the challenges, opportunities, and areas for improvement in government support relative to the development of S&T human resource in the country.
Dr. Augustus C. Resurreccion, Associate Dean for Instructions and Research of the College of Engineering, University of the Philippines Diliman (UPD) and UPD Project Leader of the Engineering Research and Development for Technology (ERDT) Program, discussed about Updates, Challenges, and Opportunities of Engineering Research and Development for Technology (ERDT) Program. According to Dr. Resurreccion, the ERDT Program, an investment for global competitiveness, was initiated to address the gap between the UNESCO benchmark and the Philippine situation.
Engr. Federico A. Monsada, president of the Philippine Technological Council (PTC), discussed about Washington Accord and Prospects of the Professions in the Industry. PTC is the umbrella organization council of 13 integrated engineering professional organizations advocating for global mobility of engineers and pursuing the alignment and recognition of Filipino engineering professionals’ qualifications. Engr. Monsada emphasized on raising the bar of standards for mobility and global competitiveness not only for Filipino engineers but also for Filipino engineering technologists and engineering technicians.
Engr. Joseph Villordon, president and vice chairman of the Quality Control and IT-BPM Analytics Initiative Leader IT & Business Process Association, talked about Human Capital Outlook in the ICT Sector. He presented the revenue and headcount distribution per sub-sector in the ICT sector as of 2014. According to Engr. Villordon, the Philippines’ potential in the industry can be attributed to its scalable educated talent pool, cost effectiveness, excellent infrastructure, government support and public-private partnership, and proven track record.
Acd. Alvin B. Culaba, member of the Engineering Sciences and Technology Division (ESTD) of NAST PHL, gave a synthesis of the discussions. He emphasized on the alignment of S&T programs that are implemented to the requirements of industry and competencies cited by PTC. The theme of the policy forum, looking back and looking forward, is indeed timely as the Philippines reflect on the accomplishments and shortcomings of the past administration and embark on a new journey towards sustainable development and inclusive growth with its inaugurated president, President Rodrigo R. Duterte.
The National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines (NAST PHL) is an attached agency of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) and the country’s highest recognition and advisory body to the government and science community on issues concerning science and technology. Visit our website at www.nast.ph or email us at secretariat@nast.ph. Please also like and follow us at: www.facebook.com/nastphlwww.twitter.com/NASTPHL, and www.instagram.com/nastphl/.
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
October 9, 2015 | Hotel Jen Manila
Contact Person: ACD. ALVIN B. CULABA
Focal Person
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
837.3170 ~ secretariat@nast.ph
ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION ON ELECTRICITY PRICING THROUGH
WHOLESALE ELECTRICITY SPOT MARKET
A roundtable discussion on Electricity Pricing through Wholesale Electricity Spot Market (WESM) sponsored by the National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines (NAST PHL), was held on October 9, 2015 at Hotel Jen Manila.
The RTD was attended by over eighty (80) representatives from different stakeholders in the electricity sector. Resource persons were Engr. Julius Eleazar A. Bunyi, Engr. Clares Loren C. Jalocon, and Engr. Jonathan B. Dela Viña, all from the Philippine Electricity Market Corporation (PEMC) and Mr. Emmanuel Y. Go, Chairman of Energy Committee, Federation of Philippine Industries.
The main points of the discussion were (a) the fundamental concepts of electricity trading and pricing mechanisms of WESM; (b) how variable renewable energy resources are scheduled for dispatch purposes and their correlative responsibilities in maintaining system security and reliability; and (c) the financial impact of the integration of Feed-in-Tariff (FIT) qualified resources in the WESM to the end-users.
During the open forum, the participants raised concerns about RA 9136 or the Electric Power Industry Reform Act (EPIRA), transparency of actual electricity billing, and on transmission congestions, among all others. Mr. Emmanuel Y. Go gave reactions representing industry concerns, He noted that the EPIRA and the Retail Competition Open Access (RCOA) are exciting developments in grid electricity but these reforms are still in their infancy and are confronted with problems such as higher generation costs.
Dr. Allan N. Soriano, professor at Mapúa Institute of Technology, synthesized the discussions. Ms. Melinda L. Ocampo, President of Philippine Electricity Market Corporation, gave the closing remarks.
The activity was organized by the Engineering Sciences and Technology Division (ESTD) of NAST PHL with the RTD focal person, Acd. Alvin B. Culaba, in partnership with the PEMC.
The National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines (NAST PHL) is an attached agency of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) and the country’s highest recognition and advisory body to the government and science community on issues concerning science and technology. Visit our website at www.nast.ph or email us at secretariat@nast.ph. Please also like and follow us at: www.facebook.com/nastphlwww.twitter.com/NASTPHL, and www.instagram.com/nastphl/.
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
February 17, 2016 | The Manila Hotel
Contact Person: ASD CHAIR ACD. EUFEMIO T. RASCO, JR.
Organizer
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
837.3170 ~ secretariat@nast.ph
Science and Technology Policy Forum on
“LINKING POVERTY REDUCTION AND AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT”
A Science and Technology Policy Forum on Linking Poverty Reduction and Agricultural Development was sponsored by the Agricultural Sciences Division (ASD) of the National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines (NAST PHL), held at The Manila Hotel last February 17, 2016.
The discussion focused on two models of agricultural development: the Saemaul Undong (SU) Movement and the Nakar Initiative. The SU Movement successfully solved the endemic rural poverty in Korea during the early 1970s. The Korean government facilitated three policy stages to achieve its desired agricultural development. In a span of less than a decade, Korea increased its rice yields and ultimately raised the household income through: (1) community participation; (2) civic capacities; and (3) resource availability. SU Movement made use of a “creative destruction” approach, by which Korea promoted ideological reform and non-discriminatory leadership to come up with new norms more appropriate for the development age.
Nakar Initiative, also known as Nakar Initiative-Experimental Living Community of Tomorrow (ELCOT), is an on-going agricultural assistance for the local farmers of General Nakar, Quezon. It is currently employing economic strategies to enable the farmers to make more than what they used to earn. The Initiative focuses not only on income generation but also on developing new approaches to improve the local farming system. These include “agents of change” who are the people who know about policies, planning, and funding strategies.
Issues concerning the rural and urban income disparity, land reform and ownership, poor credit policies in the country, and skepticism among the local farmers were discussed. Participants were in agreement that the Philippines could make use of an approach inspired by the two models — effective administration, ideological reform, and minimal role of the state (empowered communities).
The forum was organized by ASD Chair Academician (Acd.) Eufemio T. Rasco, Jr., and moderated by Acd. Ruben L. Villareal. The resource persons were Dr. Djun Kil Kim, Professorial Research Chair for the Samsung Korean Studies Program of the University of Asia and the Pacific, and Atty. Florencio B. Orendain, head of the Nakar Initiative. Assistant Professor Geny Lapiña from the College of Economics and Management, University of the Philippines Los Baños served as the discussant. Professor Ma. Eden Piadoza from the same institution synthesized and provided the highlights of the forum.
The National Academy of Science and Technology PHL is the premier advisory and recognition body on science and technology in the country. Visit our website at www.nast.ph or email us at secretariat@nast.ph. Please also like and follow us at: www.facebook.com/nastphlwww.twitter.com/NASTPHL, and www.instagram.com/nastphl/.
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
February 15, 2016 | Hotel Jen Manila
Contact Person: ACD. FERNANDO P. SIRINGAN
Focal Person
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
837.3170 ~ secretariat@nast.ph
NAST PHL HOLDS POLICY DISCUSSION
NAST PHL HOLDS POLICY DISCUSSIONS ON THE HAZARDS, RISK, AND PROFITS OF RECLAMATION
The National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines (NAST PHL) held the Policy Discussion on the Hazards, Risk, and Profits of Reclamation on February 15, 2016 at Hotel Jen Manila. The activity was organized by the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Division (MPSD) of NAST PHL, (MPSD), chaired by Academician (Acd.) Fabian M. Dayrit with the policy discussion focal person Acd. Fernando P. Siringan.
The policy discussion covered the existing reclamation projects, the environmental hazards and risks involved in reclamation, the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), and its significance in the land reclamation process.
Acd. Siringan, a member of NAST PHL and a professor from the Marine Science Institute (MSI) of the University of the Philippines Diliman, discussed the objectives of the discussion and gave an overview of the reclamation activities in the Philippines. He explained that the location of the Philippines is susceptible to fast sea level rising and it should be a factor for consideration in planning for reclamation. The sea level in the Philippines rises to about 1cm per year due to the motion of the local trade winds that influences the current of the water surrounding the archipelago, and to the warming of the sea surface in the Southeast Asian region. Further, Acd. Siringan also cited several natural phenomena that exacerbate sea level rise in the country such as the natural compaction of the land masses, dewatering of wetlands, local fault movement, and land subsidence due to regional tectonism.
Dr. Edgardo G. Alabastro, Executive Director of Technotrix Philippines, Inc., discussed the Philippine Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) system and policies for reclamation projects. He emphasized that the EIA is a planning tool to aid the decision-makers before they take actions; thus should be conducted before the project implementation.
Architect Felino A. Palafox Jr., Principal Architect-Urban Planner of Palafox Associates and President of Palafox Architecture Group, Inc., talked about the various advantages and disadvantages of reclamation. He explained that reclamation must be intended for the benefit of the people and the nature.
According to Arch. Palafox, reclamation could benefit the country economically as it could be a cheaper alternative for land development. The reclaimed land can be developed further and the issue of people claiming lands can be avoided. However, the process makes the soil weak and unstable; hence, it is not suitable for tall buildings. Further, the costly requirement in reclamation could rather be used for other
developments especially that reclamation disrupts the natural environment, contributes to traffic congestion, and slows down drainage and flood control.
The discussion of EIA and its use in decision-making was led by Dr. Ely Anthony R. Ouaño, former Director of the Environmental Management Bureau (EMB) of the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources (DENR). He explained that the EIA should be done in the early stage of the project cycle to allow decision makers to integrate the results in their decisions.
Dr. Kelvin S. Rodolfo, Corresponding Member of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Division of NAST PHL and Professor Emeritus of the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Illinois, explained the dangerous aspects of reclamation along Manila Bay and Laguna de Bay. He enumerated that the reclamation near shore Manila Bay and Laguna de Bay is not favorable and beneficial due to the fact that rapid subsidence of coastal lands is enhancing the risk of flooding and high tides. In addition, the worsening of storm surges is a clear threat to the reclaimed land. The high possibility of liquefaction and enhanced ground-shaking in the occurrence of earthquakes must not be neglected as well. Dr. Rodolfo also emphasized that the lack of appropriate studies regarding the hazards of reclaimed areas from the funded projects of the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) adds to the risk.
All of the speakers highlighted the need to properly address the reclamation issues in the country through a suitably planned, engineered, and monitored implementation of reclamation. The knowledge of the hazards, risks, and profits of reclamation must be realized for effective solutions to be devised, and and to save lives and the environment.
The National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines (NAST PHL) is an attached agency of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) and the country’s highest recognition and advisory body to the government and science community on issues concerning science and technology. Visit our website at www.nast.ph or email us at secretariat@nast.ph. Please also like and follow us at: www.facebook.com/nastphlwww.twitter.com/NASTPHL, and www.instagram.com/nastphl/.
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
April 5, 2016 | Hotel Jen Manila
Contact Person: ACD. RHODORA V. AZANZA
Focal Person
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
837.3170 ~ secretariat@nast.ph
NAST PHL HOLDS S&T POLICY FORUM ON THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON PHILIPPINE MARINE RESOURCES
The National Academy of Science and Technology Philippines (NAST PHL) through its Biological Sciences Division (BSD) organized the Science and Technology (S&T) Policy Forum on Research Findings on the Effects of Climate Change on the Philippine Marine Resources on April 5, 2016 at the Hotel Jen Manila. The policy forum was conducted to (1) review and synthesize the recorded impacts of climate change on the Philippine marine resources and (2) make recommendations relating to their sustainable utilization and management.
National Scientist Mercedes B. Concepcion welcomed the participants from different government agencies, research institutions, and other organizations specializing on marine science and climate change. Academician (Acd.) Rhodora V. Azanza, chair of BSD and focal person of the forum, gave the opening remarks and the objectives of the policy forum.
The first speaker was Dr. Vincent V. Hilomen, project manager of the Marine Key Biodiversity Areas Project of the Biodiversity Management Bureau (BMB), Department of Environmental and Natural Resources. His talk focused on the Philippine Fisheries and Biodiversity: the status of fisheries and biodiversity, potential effects of climate change, and the role of BMB in the protection of coastal and marine ecosystems. He pointed out that the increasing catch per unit effort (CPUE) on marine resources is due to seaweed culture. Thus, the current trend is in fact alarming considering that the commercial and municipal (fish/fishery) catches are actually declining. According to him, certain climate change impacts such as coral bleaching can shift species composition that would cause cascading changes in our biodiversity. With this, the BMB proposed a Coastal and Marine Ecosystems Rehabilitation Program to arrest the decline of ecosystems and increase the total potential economic value of resource.
Dr. Laura T. David, NAST Outstanding Young Scientist 2007 and professor at the Marine Science Institute of the University of the Philippines Diliman (UP-MSI), discussed the Climate Change Impacts on the Philippine Marine Environment. Studies have shown the rise in ocean temperature. Such thermal anomalies intensify coral bleaching and global migration of fishes. However, Dr. David clarified that only several decades-worth of records can help determine the actual impacts of climate change in marine biodiversity. She also shared the implications of some mangrove rehabilitation practices in the Philippines. Lack of appropriate knowledge such as use of right species to be planted, interactions among the organisms, among others could even lead to potential damages of the environment.
Coastal/Marine Resources of the Philippines and Evaluation of Climate Change Impacts was discussed by Dr. Wilfredo Roehl Y. Licuanan, professor, College of Science, De La Salle University. He defined corals as animals with plants living inside their bodies composed of small polyps, while coral reefs are large areas with structure built by corals. He described a typical coastal ecosystem in the Philippines which includes the mangroves, sea grasses, sea weeds and corals. These parts are interdependent, thus should be intact
to be able to protect coastal communities. Their study has estimated that the reef in Pangasinan could be gone in 11 years with 15% of its damage to be due to climate change, 85% to human activities. Therefore, he recommended that in order to properly manage the ecosystem, people need to know what the components of the ecosystem are, how they are doing, and what affects their health. Further, people need to coordinate their actions to prevent further damages to the ecosystem. He also showed a video of the Philippine reef from the National Assessment of Coral Reef Environment (NACRE). He concluded that these pieces of information can be used as basis for policy formulation.
A number of concerns were raised by the participants during the open forum. As pointed out by the Chairman of BSD and the speakers, the Philippine territory is “more water than land” i.e. more than 60% (especially with the recent grant of the UN) of Benham Rise at the Country’s Pacific side). Therefore, more research and management measures should be undertaken for the country’s marine resources. Issues regarding closed season fishing, changes in the species compositions of the harvest, and the productivity capacities of the marine resources were discussed among others. Many agreed that human negative impacts in the marine environment are exacerbated by climate change.
The synthesis of the forum was given by Dr. Aletta T. Yñiguez, assistant professor at UP-MSI. She reiterated that the diverse marine resources of the country provide a lot of ecosystem services and the decline in the marine ecosystem and current state of the marine resources. Philippine exposure to warming seas, rising sea levels, “souring” seas or ocean acidification, and extreme weather has damaged marine resources. She further summarized the recommendations of the previous speakers by emphasizing that ecosystem could recover by itself if “left alone” or if it is not overexploited or if it is given “breathing space”. She ended her synthesis by saying that we should think globally and act locally on the climate change issues.
National Scientist Gavino C. Trono, Jr., a member of BSD of NAST PHL, gave the closing remarks. He emphasized that climate change is here and that there is a need to adapt to it by implementing appropriate programs. He also noted that although climate change has a very big effect on the biodiversity and productivity of marine resources, we have to allow these ecosystems to recover by themselves when they are damaged by weather disturbances.
NAST PHL is the country’s highest advisory and recognition body to the government and science community on matters related to science and technology. Visit our website at www.nast.ph or email us at secretariat@nast.ph. Please also like and follow us at: www.facebook.com/nastphlwww.twitter.com/NASTPHL, and www.instagram.com/nastphl/.
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
Contact Person: Ms. LUNINGNING E. SAMARITA - DOMINGO
Director IV
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
837.3170 ~ secretariat@nast.ph
NAST PHL MEMBERS AND AWARDEES AMONG TOP SCIENTISTS – WEBOMETRICS
NAST PHL members and awardees were among the top ranking scientists in Philippine Institutions based on their Google Scholar Citations (GSC) public profiles, as reported by Webometrics, the largest academic ranking of higher education institutions.
During the second week of June 2016, Cybermetrics Lab collected data from the public profiles of researchers working in Philippine institutions as reflected through the GSC database. Among the top 453 profiles listed in the third edition of the ranking, National Scientist (NS) Lourdes J. Cruz and Academician (Acd.) Jurgenne H. Primavera ranked second and third, respectively. The academicians who made it to the top 20 were Acd. Antonio L. Dans (rank 7), Acd. Rodel D. Lasco (rank 13), Acd. Arsenio M. Balisacan (rank 14), Acd. Gisela P. Concepcion (rank 16), Acd. Allan B. Bernardo (rank 18), and Fernando P. Siringan (rank 19).
Outstanding Young Scientist awardees also secured spots in the list namely: Arnel Salvador (rank 4); Raymond Tan (rank 5); Arvin C. Diesmos (rank 9); Porfirio Alino (rank 12); Ernesto Pernia (rank 15); and Mary Ann Lansang (rank 17). NS Gavino C. Trono Jr. landed on the 20th spot.
Webometrics publish a unique ranking of universities in every edition – a result of a careful investigation of a combination of indicators. Its data is generated by Cybermetrics Lab, which has been developing quantitative studies on the academic web since the mid-90s.
The ranking aims to promote academic web presence by supporting Open Access initiatives, electronic access to scientific publications, and other academic materials. It also uses web indicators as proxies in the correct, comprehensive, deep evaluation of the university global performance, taking into account its activities, outputs, and their relevance and impact.
Google Scholar (GS) is a free bibliographic database while GSC is a tool for setting up author profiles of individuals and their publications as covered by GS.
To view the full list, visit http://www.webometrics.info/en/node/148.
The National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines (NAST PHL) is an attached agency of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) and the country’s highest recognition and advisory body to the government and science community on issues concerning science and technology. Visit our website at www.nast.ph or email us at secretariat@nast.ph. Please also like and follow us at: www.facebook.com/nastphlwww.twitter.com/NASTPHL, and www.instagram.com/nastphl/.
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
March 28, 2016 | Hotel Jen Manila
Contact Person: ACD.MICHAEL L.TAN
Focal Person
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
837.3170 ~ secretariat@nast.ph
IN FOCUS: PREDATORY JOURNALS AND CONFERENCES
On March 28, 2016, the National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines (NAST PHL), together with the University of the Philippines Diliman (UP Diliman), administered a symposium on Predatory Journals and Conferences at Hotel Jen Manila.
National Scientist (NS) Mercedes B. Concepcion welcomed the participants and pointed out the importance of the rigorous peer review in research publications that is essentially forfeited by predatory journals and conferences.
Academician (Acd.) and Chancellor of UP Diliman Michael L. Tan enumerated the following objectives of the gathering: to inform the scientific community about the dangers of predatory journals and conferences, to assist the scientific community to understand the roots of predatory journals and conferences, and to recommend measures to reduce the risk of falling into prey to predatory journals and conferences.
In his presentation titled “Threats to Academe: Predatory Publications and Conferences,” Dr. Fidel R. Nemenzo, vice chancellor for Research and Development and professor of Mathematics at the UP Diliman, defined predatory journals and conferences as money-making scams to lure researchers, who need to enhance their profiles; and are insidious threats to the integrity of our research, scholastic, and academic standards. It has been emphasized that most researchers are pressured to publish their researches and articles since hiring, promotion, tenure, and grants are based on citation metrics, which are directly evaluated through the number of publications and types of citations.
The term predatory journal was coined after Jeffrey Beall, who lists potential, possible, and probable scholarly open-access journals on his website: www.scholarlyoa.com. Dr. Nemenzo also presented several examples of predatory journals, conferences, and hijacked journals.
Predatory journals and conferences can be characterized by the excessive use of the words “global,” “international,” “multidisciplinary,” and “interdisciplinary;” high acceptance rate or guarantee, use of faulty grammar, fake editorial boards and impact factor, minimal or non-existent peer review, rapid publication, open access, and payment of publication fee or author’s fee.
The reactors were Dr. Jose Florencio F. Lapeña Jr., professor, College of Medicine, UP Manila; Acd. Jose Maria P. Balmaceda, dean, College of Science, UP Diliman; Dr. Franco G. Teves, director for Research and Professor of Microbiology, Mindanao State University-Iligan State University; and Acd. Evelyn Mae
Tecson-Mendoza, chair, Publications and Website Committee and former secretary of NAST PHL. Dr. Lapeña Jr. and Acd. Balmaceda discussed several points on how to identify and avoid predatory journals and conferences while Dr. Teves shared Mindanao State University’s experience in dealing with predatory journals and conferences as well as the measures they employ in their institution. Acd. Mendoza stressed on the awareness of the existence of predatory journals and conferences and NAST PHL’s share in the dissemination of information, as per discussion and approval with the NAST Executive Council.
After lunch, Acd. Michael L. Tan facilitated an open forum, where the participants enthusiastically addressed their concerns and experiences regarding the status of research and publication in the country.
To cap off an insightful gathering, National Scientist Gelia T. Castillo recalled the state of research and publications during her time, when research ethics are highly valued and publications are badges of honor. She suggested that the criteria for awards, tenure, and promotion in research and academic institutions must be revisited, the compensation for researchers should be increased, and that young researchers should be trained on research writing and ethics.
The symposium was attended by national scientists, academicians, researchers and directors, faculty members, and representatives from various institutions including DOST-attached agencies, higher education institutions (HEIs), and research institutions across the Philippines.
The National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines (NAST PHL) is an attached agency of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) and the country’s highest recognition and advisory body to the government and science community on issues concerning science and technology.
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
Contact Person: Ms. LUNINGNING E. SAMARITA - DOMINGO
Director IV
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
837.3170 ~ secretariat@nast.ph
NAST PHL MEMBERS CITED AMONG TOP 100 SCIENTISTS IN ASIA
Four members of the National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines (NAST PHL), namely, National Scientist (NS) Ramon C. Barba, NS Angel C. Alcala, NS Edgardo D. Gomez and NS Gavino C. Trono, made the list of top scientists in Asia, which was released by The Asian Scientist Magazine (ASM) as an initiative to raise awareness of the quality research in Asia.
National Scientist Ramon C. Barba ranked 3rd on the list. Dr. Barba was conferred as national scientist in 2014 for the mango flowering induction technology he developed that allows the year-round production of mango. He also pioneered the tissue culture of banana and sugarcane for micropropagation.
National Scientist Angel C. Alcala who was ranked 7th, was named as national scientist in 2014 for his outstanding contributions to the systematics, ecology, and diversity of amphibians and reptiles as well as the conservation of marine-protected areas.
National Scientist Edgardo D. Gomez is recognized for his pioneering contributions to invertebrate biology and ecology and giant clam culture and restoration, and coral reef assessment and conservation, for which he was conferred as national scientist in 2014 and eventually secured him the 9th spot in the top 100 in Asia.
National Scientist Gavino C. Trono Jr. ranked 12th for his contributions and accomplishments in tropical marine phycology particularly on seaweed biodiversity, taxonomy, culture, and ecology. He was conferred as national scientist in 2014.
Another Filipino scientist who made it to the list was Dr. Alfredo Mahar Lagmay, executive director of the Department of Science and Technology Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards (Project NOAH). He received the 2015 Plinius Medal from the European Geosciences Union for his research on natural hazards and disasters in the Philippines.
The rank and title of national scientist is the highest award accorded to Filipino scientists bestowed by the Philippine government. NAST PHL, through the Presidential Decree 1003-A, is mandated to recognize outstanding achievement in science and technology and provide meaningful incentives to those engaged in scientific and technological researches.
The National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines (NAST PHL) is an attached agency of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) and the country’s highest recognition and advisory body to the government and science community on issues concerning science and technology. Visit our website at www.nast.ph or email us at secretariat@nast.ph. Please also like and follow us at: www.facebook.com/nastphlwww.twitter.com/NASTPHL, and www.instagram.com/nastphl/.es, in 1956.
Built in 1969, the 279-foot vessel was operated by Scripps Oceanography as part of the University–National Laboratory System (UNOLS) to conduct general oceanographic research functions. It is equipped with permanent scientific equipment such as multibeam, sub-bottom profiler, magnetometer, gravity meter, an acoustic Doppler current profiler and an underway data system, which can support a wide range of activities across every discipline of oceanography.
BRP Gregorio Velasquez was turned over to the Philippine Navy by the US government as promised by US President Barack Obama during his APEC visit in the country last year. It is expected to render services for oceanographic and environmental research. The naval ship will be used to study the Benham Rise, a minerals- and natural gas- rich region located in the Philippine Sea, about 250 km east of the northern coastline of Isabela in northern Luzon.
The National Academy of Science and Technology PHL is the premier advisory and recognition body on science and technology in the country. Visit our website at www.nast.ph or email us at secretariat@nast.ph. Please also like and follow us at: www.facebook.com/nastphlwww.twitter.com/NASTPHL, and www.instagram.com/nastphl/.
National Academy of Science and Technology
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Aquatic, and Natural Resources Research and Development
April 7, 2016 | Institute of Plant Breeding, UPLB
Contact Person: ACD. EUFEMIO T. RASCO, JR.
Focal Person
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
837.3170 ~ secretariat@nast.ph

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Images from the Past: A Pictorial Essay of Philippine History and Heritage At NCCA Gallery

The conference is cosponsored by the NCCA-Committee on Historical Research and the Philippine National Historical Society, and will present papers on studies highlighting aspects of Manila’s history and culture, as well as studies on national history that interface in Manila’s historical development.

A photo exhibit, “Images from the Past: A Pictorial Essay of Philippine History and Heritage,” will be mounted during the conference and will be on view until Sept. 4 will be on display.

The following are the papers to be presented: “An Interpretation of the Boxer Codex” by Jorge Mojarro; “The Culinary Annotations of Fr. Manuel Blanco, OSA, ‘In Flora de Filipinas,’” Felice Prudente Sta. Maria; “Archives and Archaeology: Digging Deep into the Foundation of La Ignaciana Apostolic Center in Sta. Ana, Manila,” Katherine Ann B. Manalo and Grace Barretto-Tesoro; “Felipe Padilla de Leon Sr. (1912-1992): The Man, the Musician, and His Philosophy,” Renato B. Lucas;

SHDA Housing Fair Gathers More Than 30 Home Developers and Suppliers Under One Roof


The Subdivision & Housing Developers Association Inc. (SHDA), the largest and leading organization of housing developers in the Philippines, will once again gather some of the most reliable home developers and suppliers in a huge one-stop shop for three days. SHDA’s 3rd Housing Expo will be held at the Glorietta Activity Center in Ayala Center, Makati City from August 25 to 28, 2016.
John Paul Dy, committee chairman, says: "The Housing Fair is a much-anticipated event among prospective homeowners because we bring together under one roof the biggest companies that offer various products and services for their homes. It is a one-stop destination for everything and anything that they may need."
Among the featured exhibitors are: 8990 Housing Devt. Corp., Axeia Devt Corp., Ayala Land, Boysen Phils., Breezewoods, Chinabank, CHMI Land, Inc., Citihomes, Davies, DDC Land, DMCI Homes, Duraville, Filinvest, Hausland, Holcim, Homemark Inc., Honeycomb Builders, Jacinto Color Steel, James Hardie Phils., Lamudi Phils., Lumina Homes, Masaito, Matimco, Inc., PA Properties, PDB Properties, Phinma Properties, Prominence Properties, Property Company of Friends, Pueblo de Oro, Robinsons Banking Corporation, SM Devt Corp., Steeltech, Suntrust Properties, and United Coconut Planters Bank.
Aside from unifying Philippine home developers, SHDA partners with the government and other sectors in pursuit of its Roadmap to 2030 for better housing options for Filipinos from all strata of society.